High on Watchung In the Mountains of Central New Jersey

 Nestled in the hilly Watchung Mountains in Central New Jersey, this tight knit  community of Watchung offers more amenities than you might think. In addition to parks (Mobus Field, Philips Field, Watchung Lake Park), valleys  and waterways, an arts center offers monthly art exhibitions, music  performances and art, photography, yoga and dance classes for both adults and  children, and there is an array of fine cuisine in which to partake.  

 The area is quite picturesque. The Watchung Mountains are known for their  numerous scenic vistas overlooking the New York City and New Jersey skylines,  as well as their isolated ecosystems containing rare plants, endangered  wildlife, rich minerals, and globally-imperiled trap rock glade communities.  

 In Watchung, there’s something for everyone from foodies (expect to find top-notch Thai, Italian,  Japanese eateries) to the horsey set, as the town plays host to numerous horse  shows each year. Families and businessmen/women, are attracted to the town  because of its above average schools, low crime rate (there hasn’t been a murder in Watchung in over a decade) and a relatively-short 40 minute  commute to New York City.  

 What's In a Name

 The name “Watchung’ comes from the Lenni Lenape Native Americans, meaning “high hills.” It is from the first ridge of the Watchung Mountains (appropriately named the  First, Second and Third Watchung mountains) that George Washington surveyed the  British troops in Perth Amboy. The eastern reach of these ridges is to the  Oranges in the direction of Newark. The name “Washingtonville” was used in early times but rejected as the name for the area by the United  States Postal Service because New Jersey already had too many places named  Washington.  

 The Legend

 Around 1670, a group of Dutch settlers under the leadership of Captain  Michaelson was traveling from the Amboys up an Indian trail at the same time  The Watchung tribe of Lenni Lanape Indians was traveling for their annual  summer trip to the ocean to fish and collect shells for wampum.  

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